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poetryprosepeopleandplaces:

I think human consciousness is a tragic misstep in evolution. We became too self-aware. Nature created an aspect of nature separate from itself. We are creatures that should not exist by natural law. We are things that labor under the illusion of having a self. A secretion of sensory experience and feeling, programmed with total assurance that we are each somebody. When in fact, everybody’s nobody.

(Source: likeasummer, via ouijabored)

(Source: arcaneimages)

castromarketsfca:

Joseph Simons

(via tarheeltrash)

Word of the Day

obscure-etymology:

Manubial, /ma’nü-bēal/ - Belonging to spoils; taken in war.

       Source: Webster’s Unabridged New Twentieth Century Dictionary, 1956

Word of the Day

obscure-etymology:

Kithe, /kīthe/ - To recognize or to be recognized.

       Source: Webster’s Unabridged New Twentieth Century Dictionary, 1956

mentalalchemy:

has science gone too far

mentalalchemy:

has science gone too far

(Source: absolvd)

abcstarstuff:

Saturn’s shadows It may seem odd to think of planets casting shadows out in the inky blackness of space, but it is a common phenomenon. Earth’s shadow obscures the Moon during a lunar eclipse, and Jupiter’s moons cast small shadows onto their parent planet.
One of the best places in our Solar System to spot intriguing and beautiful celestial shadows is at Saturn. On 1 July, the international Cassini mission celebrates 10 years of exploring Saturn, its rings and its moons, an endeavour that has produced invaluable science but also stunning images like this.
Drifting along in the foreground, small and serene, is Saturn’s icy moon Mimas. The blue backdrop may at first appear to be the gas giant’s famous and impressive set of rings, with pale and dark regions separated by long inky black slashes, but it is actually the northern hemisphere of Saturn itself. The dark lines slicing across the frame are shadows cast by the rings onto the planet.
Although we may not associate the colour blue with Saturn, when Cassini arrived at the planet the northernmost regions displayed the delicate blue palette shown in this image. As this region of Saturn is generally quite free of cloud, scattering by molecules in the atmosphere causes sunlight to take a longer path through the atmosphere. The light is scattered predominantly at shorter – bluer – wavelengths. This is similar to why the sky on Earth appears blue to our eyes.
Seasonal changes over the years since this photo was taken have turned the blue into Saturn’s more familiar golden hue. The reverse is occurring in the south, which is slowly becoming bluer.
This image is composed of infrared, optical and ultraviolet observations from Cassini’s narrow-angle camera on 18 January 2005. The colours closely match what the scene would look like in true colour.
The Cassini–Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, ESA and Italy’s ASI space agency.
Copyright NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

abcstarstuff:

Saturn’s shadows

It may seem odd to think of planets casting shadows out in the inky blackness of space, but it is a common phenomenon. Earth’s shadow obscures the Moon during a lunar eclipse, and Jupiter’s moons cast small shadows onto their parent planet.

One of the best places in our Solar System to spot intriguing and beautiful celestial shadows is at Saturn. On 1 July, the international Cassini mission celebrates 10 years of exploring Saturn, its rings and its moons, an endeavour that has produced invaluable science but also stunning images like this.

Drifting along in the foreground, small and serene, is Saturn’s icy moon Mimas. The blue backdrop may at first appear to be the gas giant’s famous and impressive set of rings, with pale and dark regions separated by long inky black slashes, but it is actually the northern hemisphere of Saturn itself. The dark lines slicing across the frame are shadows cast by the rings onto the planet.

Although we may not associate the colour blue with Saturn, when Cassini arrived at the planet the northernmost regions displayed the delicate blue palette shown in this image. As this region of Saturn is generally quite free of cloud, scattering by molecules in the atmosphere causes sunlight to take a longer path through the atmosphere. The light is scattered predominantly at shorter – bluer – wavelengths. This is similar to why the sky on Earth appears blue to our eyes.

Seasonal changes over the years since this photo was taken have turned the blue into Saturn’s more familiar golden hue. The reverse is occurring in the south, which is slowly becoming bluer.

This image is composed of infrared, optical and ultraviolet observations from Cassini’s narrow-angle camera on 18 January 2005. The colours closely match what the scene would look like in true colour.

The Cassini–Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, ESA and Italy’s ASI space agency.

Copyright NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

(Source: starstuffblog, via mentalalchemy)

luluheal:

collaboration with jack moss

luluheal:

collaboration with jack moss

(via mentalalchemy)

italianartsociety:

Today is the Feast Day of St. Anthony of Padua, who died on this day in 1231. Born in Lisbon, Portugal as Fernando Martins de Bulhões, Anthony first pursued the religious life as an Augustinian but transferred to the Franciscan Order in 1221 after the deaths of five Franciscan martyrs who were brought to Anthony’s monastery in Coimbra on their way home for burial. Anthony traveled to Morocco to continue the work of the martyrs, but upon his return trip was diverted to Sicily by a great storm. From there he traveled to Tuscany and settled in Forlì. Towards the end of his short life (he died in his mid 30s), Anthony settled in Padua as Provincial Superior for the Franciscan Order in Northern Italy. Anthony succumbed to illness in 1231 and was canonized remarkably quickly by Pope Gregory IX in the following year.

The saint is recognizable by his youthful appearance and Franciscan habit — a simple brown robe and rope belt, and he typically holds a book, lilies, or appears with the infant Jesus, whom he saw in a miraculous vision. Today is often invoked as the finder of lost things as in this popular North American version: “Dear St. Anthony, please come ‘round. Something’s been lost and can’t be found.”

Simone Martini, St. Anthony of Padua and St Francis, 1320-25, fresco, Cappella di San Martino, Lower Church, San Francesco, Assisi

Benozzo Gozzoli, St Anthony of Padua, 1450s, panel, Santa Maria d’ Aracoeli, Rome

Piero della Francesca, Polyptych of St Anthony, c. 1470, panel, Galleria Nazionale dell’Umbria, Perugia —  commissioned by the nuns of the convent of Sant’Antonio da Padova in Perugia

Cosmè Tura, St. Anthony of Padua Reading, c. 1475, wood, Musée du Louvre, Paris

Bernardo Zenale, St. Anthony of Padua, 1502-07, panel, Museo Poldi Pezzoli, Milan from an altarpiece in the church of San Francesco, Cantù. 

Titian, Madonna and Child with Sts Anthony of Padua and Roch, c. 1511, oil on canvas, Museo del Prado, Madrid

Titian, View of the Sala Capitolare with scenes from the life of St. Anthony, 1511, frescoes, Scuola del Santo, Padua

Guercino, St Anthony of Padua with the Infant Christ, 1656, oil on canvas, private collection

Carlo Francesco Nuvulone, St Anthony of Padua and the Infant Christ, 17th century, oil on panel, private collection

Sebastiano Ricci, St Anthony of Padua Healing a Youth, c. 1690, oil on canvas, Musée du Louvre, Paris

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

thebricklanegallery:

Juan Herman (from Spain) was born Barcelona, Juan studied in the University of Fine Arts in Barcelona. There, he absorbed the work of the surreal artists of his homeland, Dali, Miro, and Picasso, subsequently refining his own visual and conceptual vocabulary, that emerged through his focus on the intersection between reality, unconsciousness, and spatial analysis. “Love A(rt)ffair” is a puzzle where portraits from the masters are the pieces, and where the imagination of the viewer constructs the meanings. He currently lives and works in London, UK and his last exhibition was with the New Artist Fair 2013. 

Juan Herman exhibits in CONTEMPORARY PAINTING from 12th – 22nd June 2014 at The Brick Lane Gallery – The Annexe, 93-95 Sclater Street, E1 6HR. For more information on CONTEMPORARY PAINTING or to become a future exhibitor, please email info@thebricklanegallery.com

(Source: juanherman.com, via darksilenceinsuburbia)

“Love is also a violence, and cannot be undone.”

—   Simon Van Booy, The Illusion of Separateness (via loveage-moondream)

(Source: larmoyante, via thedevilisawakewithinme)